Tag Archives: Mashable

Millennial Job Searching

9 Apr

I don’t know about you, but I find job hunting very time consuming and challenging. My co-op workterm search is still under way and I am cutting it pretty close to my proposed start date of May 1, 2011.

Based on the article LinkedIn Edges Out Want Ads As Job Search Tool for Millennials on Mashable by Todd Wasserman, LinkedIn is becoming an increasingly popular choice for Millennials to search for their entry-level job after graduation.

According to a survey on Millennials, LinkedIn is replacing newspaper ads as a source of information about new jobs. Twenty-eight percent of Millennials plan to seek work through LinkedIn, as opposed to the previous percentage of 7%. The same proportion of respondents — 28% — plan to find work via newspaper ads, which has decreased by 6% since last year.

The survey was based on a February poll of 8,088 respondents, 73% of whom will be graduating and looking for full-time employment in two years. The chart below shows how respondents plan to apply to jobs.

An interesting finding from the report was that Millennials don’t find the size of the company to be a preference and that 64% of them plan to stay at their new job for two to five years. Another 24.1% say they plan to stay with their employer for more than 10 years.

According to Razor Suleman, CEO and founder of I Love Rewards, this presents a significant “opportunity for employers to make their Millenials happy,” and suggests that “companies put energy into improving their image among Millennials so they’ll want to work there.”

If the hunters are on LinkedIn, employers should take the initiative to be on there too.

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LivingSocial to Overtake Groupon?!

26 Mar

According to the article on Mashable by Sarah Kessler, “LivingSocial Says it Will Overtake Groupon in January 2012,” among all of the group couponing sites, none of them are serious competitors to Groupon except the up-and-coming LivingSocial site.

LivingSocial was launched in December 2009, and has a total of $232 million in funding — $175 million of it from Amazon. These numbers might seem miniscule when compared to Groupon’s $950 million, and $25 billion worth, but according to the U.S.-market revenue data for both sites, compiled by LivingSocial, it’s been enough to seriously challenge Groupon.


The statistics used to compare the two companies were compiled using variables such as daily publishing, the price of their deals and the number of deals they sell. LivingSocial’s market share has been steadily increasing since 2009. Currently, for every $10 of deals sold on either platform, $4 of them take place at LivingSocial.

LivingSocial has its Escapes deals unlike Groupon, which is their main competitive advantage. Deals on vacations are more appealing than receiving 50% at a restaurant, and LivingSocial has realized that. The company has also realized that it takes time for users to decide whether they want that vacation package or not, so the deadlines to purchase are longer than their daily deals.

If both companies continue to grow at their current rates, LivingSocial’s portion of sales will overtake Groupon’s in January 2012. Groupon’s decreasing market share does not  indicate decreasing sales, however, the change is more due to the fact that LivingSocial is growing at a faster rate than Groupon.

As the company starting with 100% market share in 2008, Groupon started the entire group buying market, but it wouldn’t take long before competitors jumped in to take a piece of the pie. Fortunately for both companies, the market is continuing to expand at rapid rates, and is expected to grow 138% to 2.7 billion this year.

Make All of Your Content Embeddable

20 Mar

According to an article on Mashable by Jennifer Van Grove, when surfing the web, most site visitors will stay on a page 250% longer when the site contains embedded media.

Sean Creeley, the founder of Y Combinator startup company Embedly, created a service that makes it easy for publishers and application developers to add embedded media to better engage their web users.
“The idea is to engage the user where they are,” says Creeley. “
We really want to get the user where they live, instead of making them try to jump through hoops to view multimedia content.” Embedly has the ability to take any URL or RSS feed and embed the important content onto a third party site. In fact, Embedly has created the consumer-facing Parrotfish — available as a Safari, Firefox or Chrome plugin — to bring the web’s media from more than 165 providers into the Twitter experience. Parrotfish enables Twitter to make all URLs and articles eligible within the Twitter website. On a daily basis, Embedly serves 5.5 million URLs to 1,100 sites.

Embedly powers the content embedding for a wide range of services (such as Yammer, Tweetdeck, Bit.ly, Bundles, Storify, Keepstream, and Reddit) so that URLs become live content you can see or hear on site. The Embedly customer can choose from a free plan with access to 250 providers or the paid plan that unlocks content associated with any URL or RSS feed. The paid premium service comes with daily, hourly and minute-by-minute breakdowns of the most popular URLs and domains, as well as Google Safe Browse security features to protect their site visitors against masked URL phishing tactics. Next week, Embedly plans to release an iOS library and Android library, which will let customers add embedded content into the mobile experience. Exciting stuff! Who’s interested?!

Social Media & Culture

24 Feb

Because I chose to focus on social media and its effects on communication for one of my class presentations, I was intrigued to find an interesting opinion article on Mashable by Josh Rose, which highlights how social media is positively impacting our culture.

Josh questions if social media channels make you feel closer or further away from people, and explores the effect of the internet on our humanity. He points out that the majority of people feel closer to people they are further away from, but further away from the people they are closest to. Josh explains that this confusing paradox where two conflicting realities exist side-by-side draw us nearer and distance us at the same time.

In the New Yorker, Adam Gopnik explores cultural truism in his article “How the Internet Gets Inside Us.” He categorizes three viewpoints: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers and the Ever-Wasers. Each group contains people that see the social media evolution as good, bad or normal.

According to Josh, “people are not giving up long-form reading, considered thinking or social interactions. They are just filling all the space between.” Josh goes on to explain that the interaction happening through the internet and social media is not like an interaction we have ever seen before. I found this very interesting as Dave Olson would beg to differ. Dave believes that social media purposes are almost identical to what we have been using all along (telegrams, scrapbooking, photo albums).

Josh compares this intriguing interaction to “an intertwining sine wave that touches in and out continuously.” He argues that the internet does not steal our humanity, it reflects it; it doesn’t get inside us, it shows what’s inside us. Ultimately, social media is a tool that is hard to define, and is destroyed only at great risk. Josh’s final point emphasizes the fact that people should stop discussing how technology is changing us and forcing us to refrain from social interaction; rather, we should take a look at the unbelievable things we are accomplishing by using it.

Here is the full article on Mashable that I encourage you to read!